HOW WE ARE DIFFERENT​​

Bethlehem Community Health is a cooperatively managed, 501 (c) 3, non-profit corporation registered in the state of Ohio.    We are a volunteer led agency that is able to provide services with a minimal overhead due to affiliations with local universities, churches and small businesses. A key aspect of this model is our partnership with academic institutions. Case Western Reserve, Cleveland State, and Cuyahoga Community College support our work by providing student interns, supervision and legal counsel on a volunteer basis and our Board of Directors include faculty from each affiliated academic institution to ensure accountability.

We are a whole health service provider, with a commitment to a multi-lingual, multi-ethnic base, and the only community based agency in Ohio that specifically provides aftercare for resettled refugees utilizing a multi-lingual case management team who are themselves refugees and new immigrants. Through our African-American Initiative, we prioritize programs and services that support this community as well. 
  
However, although our primary mission is to serve the forementioned groups, we serve all communities. Our service is for people who are trying to stay healthy and find balance in their lives, whoever they are. We believe that healthy people create healthy communities and healthy communities are the basis of healthy societies.

The thing that makes us unique is how we serve. At BCH, every program coordinator is a case manager, and every program participant, whether they are in a music program, taking a single yoga class, or participtating in a gardening program, receive supportive services based on an initial assessment. For some participants, that might just mean a free music classes. For others, it might mean, legal or behavioral health referrals. Participants whether they participate in one activity or an ongoing program, are members.

Our goal is to support mental health, but t is a different kind of mental health care; more proactive, less intrusive and ultimately less threatening to communities under stress.